PHONE: 800.707.8922
REFERRAL PHONE: 800.707.8921
REFERRAL FAX: 216.383.5298
DONATE NOW

Linda Perlic Honored for Warehouse Sale Leadership

November 21, 2014

IMG_1841

Pictured (L-R) are Lisa Scotese Gallagher, Jeff Lycan, Linda Perlic, volunteers Betti Hegedus, Carol McCreary,Karen Donahue and CEO Bill Finn

Hospice of the Western Reserve Volunteer Linda Perlic was honored for her work on the organization’s Warehouse Sales by Midwest Care Alliance on Nov. 12.  Jeff Lycan, President/CEO of Midwest Care Alliance, presented Linda with the Honorable Recognition certificate at a reception at Hospice of the Western Reserve’s headquarters.

Lisa Scotese Gallagher said that” in just a few months, Linda took an idea and turned it into a wonderful reality.”

When the idea surfaced, Perlic organized a Warehouse Sale Team comprised of more than 50 volunteer staff and started planning the first Warehouse Sale. She has overseen all components of the sales, implementing policies and procedures leading to overwhelming success in each area.

Perlic was credited with using creativity in obtaining not just quantity, but quality items, reaching out to consignment shops and retailers to donate items.

perlic award 2

Linda Perlic (in red) accepts a certificate from . Looking on are Lisa Scotese Gallagher and Hospice of the Western Reserve CEO Bill Finn.

She created marketing materials and formed a specialized committee to distribute flyers and spread the word in the community. Through internal marketing, donations were made by both staff and family members. The first four sales were held in an eight-month period.

The sales have been a resounding success, with the first five generating more than $47,000 in gross revenue and a profit of almost $25,000.

Perlic was honored just two before the sixth sale, held Nov. 14 and 15. Lycan was able to tour the facility ahead of the sale.

“I just put a bid in on half the items,” he joked. “But seriously, I think recognizing our volunteers is so important and so critical.”

For her part, Perlic thanked her team saying she couldn’t do it alone, thanking co-volunteers Betti Hegedus, Carol McCreary and Karen Donahue.

Hospice of the Western Reserve CEO Bill Finn thanked Perlic, calling her an advocate and “good friend” of the Hospice of the Western Reserve.

 

 

 

 

Nov. 28-30: Take a Bob Evans Holiday Break and 15% Goes to Hospice

November 21, 2014

Dine in or carryout…and help support Hospice of the Western Reserve. 

 

bobEvans_Flyer

Enjoy dining at Bob Evans? Dine to make a difference this weekend.

From November 28-30, Bob Evans locations across Northeast Ohio will donate 15% of sales to Hospice of the Western Reserve. Here’s how you participate:

  1. Download and print the official flyer
  2. Bring your printed flyer to any participating Bob Evans Restaurant in Northeast Ohio (Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Portage, Medina, Stark and Summit Counties).
  3. Enjoy a delicious Bob Evans meal – dine in or carry out options available.
  4. Present your flyer at check out, and enjoy your meal knowing you’ve made a difference.

 

Click here to find your local Bob Evans location.

Wishes Granted Help Patients Make the Most of Life 

November 21, 2014

Hospice is about more than care for the dying; it makes meaningful moments possible even when a person is facing a serious or even terminal illness. One of the great myths of hospice for families who have never experienced it is that it is focused only on “brink of death” care, and is appropriate only in the final few days of life.

In actuality, when patients are admitted to hospice at the appropriate time – when there are weeks or months rather than days – hospice has an opportunity to do its best work, focusing not only on controlling pain, but on supporting the entire family and focusing on achieving the best quality of life possible.

What makes a good death? This is a question that many people prefer not to think about in their day-to-day lives. For most, a good death is quite simple. It means being physically comfortable, at peace in their own homes and surrounded by loved ones. Just as importantly, it means doing the things they love to do up until the very end. These essential details are made possible by hospice care.

Hospice of the Western Reserve offers an unparalleled number of life enrichment events in its region geared toward providing a more meaningful, fulfilling or rewarding end-of-life experiences, fulfilling more than 750 special wishes for patients and their families.

Stanley “Butch” Butchar, a stage 4 prostate cancer patient, was being cared for in his home by Hospice of the Western Reserve.  His care team wanted to give him a special day to look forward to so he could spend quality time with his wife. The nonprofit agency and school teamed up to provide a day of pampering.

On an early spring day, Butchar and his wife, Sharon, sat side by side in the salon at the Lorain County Joint Vocational School (JVS) in Oberlin, their feet soaking luxuriously in a bubbling foot bath. They can feel their tensions slipping away as they chat with the cosmetology students providing the couple with his and her pedicures. It was a new experience for Butch, a blue collar “man’s man” who was employed for years as a carpenter. “Don’t tell the guys about this,” he joked to his wife with a conspiratorial wink.

Following their “spa treatment,” Stanley and Sharon enjoyed a gourmet lunch prepared by the JVS Culinary Arts students followed by a behind-the-scenes tour of the school’s bakery. The bakery and pastry arts students prepared a plate of gourmet cookies for them to take home. The day ended with a tour of the school’s greenhouse, where the couple received a springtime bouquet of flowers.

Wishes granted through Hospice of the Western Reserve’s life enrichment program are as diverse as the patients and their interests.  A mother-daughter trip to the Horseshoe Casino in Cleveland. A visit to Cleveland Browns Training Camp and a chance to meet and shake hands with the players and coaches. A personal  “Cruise In” in the hospice house parking lot complete with ‘50s music provided by a live deejay, a popcorn machine and rows upon rows of gleaming classic cars on display.

Generous support from individual donors, foundations and the community allow Hospice of the Western Reserve to customize a diverse range of experiences limited only by the patient’s imagination and interests. Staff and volunteers have coordinated everything from campouts (complete with s’mores and tents) to patient weddings to Lake Erie sunset cruises to visits to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

 

Job Opening: Hospitality Aide

November 20, 2014

 

HOSPITALITY AIDE
Location: Ames Family Hospice House, Westlake, OH

Perform housekeeping duties in assigned areas.

Requirements: Must be able to read, write English and carry out instructions

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

It’s Not About Dying. It’s About Living.

November 17, 2014

Public discussions about dying are rare. However, a recent news story about a young woman with brain cancer who chose her time of death by taking medications prescribed by her doctor, (a legal option in Oregon), have brought the taboo topic to the forefront. The widely publicized case also points to a need for greater awareness about care options for patients with life-limiting illnesses.    

Hospice does not endorse or engage in euthanasia or assisted suicide and is founded on the principle that every individual deserves to live the best quality of life through the entire spectrum of life.

 “One of the best ways I have found to help educate people who don’t understand hospice is to explain that it’s not about dying until you die. It’s about living until you die,” said Bob Phillips Plona, R.N., director of residential services for David Simpson Hospice House, said.

That includes the final phase of life, as at-home patient Michele Tripi, diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) has proven. The disease progressively disables nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, ultimately leading to death. One by one, ALS takes things away, like the ability to walk, sit upright, use one’s hands, even to speak.

Michele, 55, was introduced to the idea of utilizing hospice earlier rather than waiting until the final few days of life at a support group offered by the Northern Ohio Chapter of the ALS Association.  

Knowing her prognosis, Tripi did not want to have strangers involved in her care or helping her family, and opted for in-home care. Hospice of the Western Reserve’s team, including her hospice physician nurse, social worker, nursing aide, music, art and massage therapists, spiritual care coordinator and volunteers, went to work.

Her music therapist arranged to have some of Tripi’s poetry set to music to create original songs. Her art therapist helped her make new memories with her grandkids – including a tea party at her kitchen table complete with homemade hats. Working with the art therapist, Tripi has also created several legacy pieces for her family, including a poignant and beautifully written book about her life and special memories. She and her daughter, Jackie, combed through family photos and worked together to create the keepsake book. Hospice arranged to have it professionally bound and published and made copies for family members.

Tripi’s experiences have led her to become a leading educational advocate for hospice. “It doesn’t improve the quality of your life if you wait till the end,” she said. “I stayed healthier, stayed happier being at home. Hospice has been a key factor in that.”

Honoring Our Veterans…Every Day

November 10, 2014

Americans across the country will observe Veterans Day on November 11, a special day to salute the men and women who have bravely served our country and we encourage you to do the same.

Recently, we had an opportunity to care for a World War II veteran and his wife, a real-life “Rosie the Riveter,” married almost seven decades. Joe and Helen Wilkinson, and three generations of family members, were honored at a very special recognition ceremony in April, and we captured their story on video. (Click video below to see their story.)

This is just one of the ways we honor and assist our country’s veterans. Here are some other ways:

  • Over the past two years, we’ve provided care to more than 3,200 veterans throughout Northeast Ohio, including those nearing the end of life.
  • Our Peaceful & Proud program provides training for clinical care teams so they can address complex issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse.
  • Pairing volunteers who are veterans with patients who are veterans to provide the camaraderie of shared experiences.
  • Remain actively involved with We Honor Veterans, an innovative program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization offered in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. We are among an elite group that has achieved a “partner level four” designation from the national program, given only to hospices demonstrating the highest level of commitment to veterans.
  • Conducting private and public “veterans recognition ceremonies.” This year, more than 2,000 veterans will be honored and personally thanked in public recognition ceremonies. Many more will be recognized by the hospice in private bedside ceremonies for patients and their families.

We urge you, your family and friends to take time to thank a veteran for their service, not just on Veterans Day, but every day.

 

It’s Never Too Late: Hospice Honors 2,000+ Veterans in 2014 

November 10, 2014

Veteran Pat Pinkerton being pinned by fellow veteran Lou DeLoss

Veterans Recognition Ceremonies, whether private or public, are always free.

Americans across the country will observe Veterans Day on November 11, a special day to salute the men and women who have bravely served our country. These fellow Americans have made sacrifices in defense of freedom. Honoring the nation’s veterans includes supporting them throughout their entire lives.

For some veterans, however, nearing the end of life can bring anguish over past war experiences. Hospice of the Western Reserve, one the nation’s largest nonprofit legacy providers of care, remains committed to those who have served in the Armed Forces during one of their most vulnerable times: the final phase of life.

Over the past two years, the agency has provided care to more than 3,200 veterans throughout Northeast Ohio, including those nearing the end of life. Its Peaceful & Proud program provides training for clinical care teams so they can address complex issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse.

Partnering Ohio’s Veterans with Volunteers

And they are doing this with the help of volunteers, specifically volunteers who have served themselves. “Northeast Ohio is home to a very large veteran population, and many vets are nearing the end of life. Some of the most important work we do is helping them find peace,” explained Bill Finn, chief executive officer.

Finn said to help address these needs, volunteers who have served in the military are paired with veteran patients, providing the camaraderie of shared experiences. Counseling, storytelling, art and music therapy, and legacy work are just a few of the ways the community-based hospice helps veterans achieve the peace they seek at the end of life.

Hospice of the Western Reserve is also actively involved with We Honor Veterans, an innovative program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization offered in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The hospice is among an elite group that has achieved a “partner level four” designation from the national program, given only to hospices demonstrating the highest level of commitment to veterans.

To thank those who have served, Hospice of the Western Reserve conducts both private and public veterans recognition ceremonies. These range from intimate ceremonies involving a single hospice patient to large public ceremonies where a hundred or more veterans are honored.  This year, more than 2,000 veterans will be honored and personally thanked in public recognition ceremonies. Many more will be recognized by the hospice in private bedside ceremonies for patients and their families.  For a schedule of upcoming public veterans appreciation events in Northeast Ohio, visit hospicewr.org/celebratingveterans.

Grieving and Giving Thanks

November 7, 2014

thanks2As Thanksgiving and the holiday season approaches, you may be wondering what you have to be thankful for this year. This time of year can be so challenging when loss is at the center of your life. Perhaps this year rather than thinking about being thankful, think more about giving thanks.

You may ask what can I give thanks for? Here are some questions to consider:

What did you learn from the person who died? What life lessons were passed on? How many hugs did that person give you? Or how many meals and deep conversations were experienced? Who taught you how to be a mother, daughter, sister, or aunt – or how to act and dress appropriately? Who cuddled with you? Who did you take long quiet walks with? Who taught you that secret recipe? Who gave you bliss? Perhaps this year you can give thanks for these moments.

In what ways did your loved one make your life sweeter and richer? What was the value of loving this person not only as a family member but as a friend?  Although it is perfectly okay to still grieve and mourn your loss, remember that grief is about love. Give thanks for being able to give and receive love.

Sometimes it’s helpful to slow things down and focus on the small moments of gratitude first. So this holiday season, try to stay in the moment. Taste the first cup of coffee or tea in the morning and be mindful of the warmth it brings. Allow small moments of pleasure and presence to move you toward healing. Being able to notice the small moments of grace are enough for now. In time, these moments may become more frequent and obvious in your life, as may the gifts your loved one has bestowed in your heart forever.

Give thanks this year for the gifts of yesterdays, the gifts of memories, love and laughter as they create the hopes of tomorrows.

Please visit our on-line grief discussions groups athttp://www.hospicewr.org/discussions/grief/.

Please like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ESPBCenter.

This article was also posted on ShareWIK.

 

‘The Call to Serve': A World War II Love Story

November 5, 2014

How did a World War II serviceman come to meet and marry and real life “Rosie the Riveter?”

We have the story of the unique courtship (it involved a long-awaited horseback ride) and love story of Joe and Helen Wilkinson, longtime residents of North Ridgeville as presented by Cleveland-area filmmaker Don Pavlish.

Pavlish earned an award for the approximately 5 and a half-minute film which included a re-enactment of the couple as teenagers and archived World War II footage as well as a recognition ceremony for three generations of Wilkinson family members.

Want to know more about this video? Read the story behind the story: The Making of ‘The Call to Serve’.

 

 

The Making of ‘The Call to Serve’

November 5, 2014

History is front and center for Cleveland-area filmmaker

Pavlish photo of filming

(Pictured L-R) Joey Carovac (actor), Gabby Husbands (actress), Rob Lehtinen (cinematographer), Don Pavlish (director). Photo courtesy of John Husbands.

It’s not every day a filmmaker has an opportunity to find out—and record—the story of a WWII veteran and how he came to marry a real-life Rosie the Riveter.

But Cleveland-are  filmmaker Don Pavlish captured the story of Joe and Helen Wilkinson, longtime North Ridgeville, Ohio residents just two months before Helen passed away at age 90. The 5:37-minute video was created for Hospice of the Western Reserve in conjunction with National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and debuted at the former’s Annual Meeting Oct. 30.

The film centers on Joe, who spent three years in the Army Air Corps during World War II  and Helen, who moved to Indiana during the war to attach wings to  planes in a factory.

Pavlish, a Pepper Pike, Ohio resident who heads the PavlishGroup, relied on interviews with family members and archived video of WWII, but needed to recreate some scenes, including how the couple’s courtship began.

“Nancy’s (the couple’s daughter) story about how Joe and Helen met as teenagers when he was showing off his riding skills gave me the idea to film the horseback and birthday party flashback sequences,” Pavlish said. “This was partially out of necessity as we didn’t have any archival photographs to illustrate the story, and partially out of a desire to illustrate the couple’s long history together by showing where it all began.”

Watch the film here on YouTube.

The historical topic was one that was close to Pavlish’s heart.

“I’ve always been a big fan of historical films and documentaries, and try to work the historical angle into my work when I can get away with it,” he said. “We’re all shaped by recent history, even if it was experienced by those generations who came before us.  By tying a modern-day subject into this common history we can help the viewer connect in a very personal way with the story we’re trying to tell.”

Pavlish award

Filmmaker Don Pavlish (right) accepts the Legacy Historian Award from Hospice of the Western Reserve CEO William Finn. Photo credit: Jerry Mann

Telling the Wilkinson’s story, however, had its challenges, including creating the flashback sequence to when the couple were teenagers. Pavlish had to find teenage actors who both resembled the present-day Joe and Helen who were also comfortable on horseback.

“I reached out to several equine associations in Northeast Ohio, and thankfully Geauga County 4H put me in touch with Joey, a 16 year old with over a decade of riding experience.  Joey and his father – an Army veteran himself – helped me find local locations that could pass for Appalachian Ohio in the 1930s.

“Gabby, the 15 year old actress who played Helen, responded to an ad I posted online.  Her father ended up helping out with the shoot when a crew member was delayed getting to the location. It was truly a team effort – everyone came together to help make those shots as perfect as possible.”

Pavlish took several weeks to edit the footage, which included that taken at a special veteran pinning ceremony in Avon Lake that honored the couple and several generations of their family.

“We had lots of footage from the medal pinning ceremony, but this video wasn’t meant to be a strict record of the ceremony,” Pavlish said. “We were additionally interested in honoring the larger story of Joe and Helen, and so we used the footage of the ceremony as a framing device for the flashbacks and interviews.”

Pavlish paid extra attention to details, including choosing appropriate music and adding sound effects. The ceremony was taped using four cameras to capture not only the ceremony, but family members’ reactions.
The most challenging aspect was editing – finding the proper structure and then digging through historical footage and filming the flashback scenes.

Pavlish’s work for Hospice of the Western Reserve, including the extra effort incurred earned him the Legacy Historian Award from the organization. He accepted the honor at the Annual Meeting.