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Job Opening: Liaison Nurse

October 20, 2014

 

LIAISON NURSE
Location: Cleveland, OH

Provide an overview of hospice services within the home, hospital, or alternative home setting and facilitates the admissions process when appropriate. Coordinate implementation of an initial plan of care based on immediate needs of the patient/family unit.

Requirements: Licensed RN in state of Ohio; BSN preferred; Experience preferred in pain and symptom management; oncology; public health; or medical/surgical background.

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Hospice of the Western Reserve Earns Community Partner Award

October 14, 2014

(L-R) Lisa Scotese Gallagher, Hospice of the Western Reserve CEO Bill Finn, Bob Plona and Joy Banish, Executive Director of the Greater Cleveland Volunteers.

“When the future is measured in weeks and months rather than years, Hospice of Western Reserve and its legions of compassionate volunteers and staff work around the clock to deliver end-of-life care and services to patients and their families,” – Greater Cleveland Volunteers. 

Greater Cleveland Volunteers, which has a long history of serving Cleveland and of promoting civic engagement, awarded Hospice of the Western Reserve the Community Partner Award.

The award was presented at Viva Volunteers, Greater Cleveland Volunteer’s Fundraiser Event on September 26 at the Ariel Center in Cleveland.

The Community Partner Award is presented annually to an organization or business that supports Greater Cleveland Volunteers with the contribution of volunteer time and resources.

Here’s what Greater Cleveland Volunteers said about Hospice of the Western Reserve:

“The community-based nonprofit, one of the pioneers of the hospice movement in the U.S., is observing its 36th year of service in 2014, and is nationally acclaimed for its role in providing state-of-the-art hospice and palliative care, caregiver support and bereavement services throughout the Northern Ohio region.”

gcv_viva_2014 151

Hospice of the Western Reserve has worked in partnership with Greater Cleveland Volunteers by contributing time and resources for more than 20 years. From supporting the organization’s Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon and Viva Volunteer fundraiser to devoting more than 60 hours over the past three years to Marketing and Programming Committee Meetings and assisting with strategic planning and program evaluation, Hospice of the Western Reserve has steadfastly supported the organization’s role as a catalyst for increased volunteerism in our community.”

Currently, the two organizations share 32 volunteers, who have jointly contributed more than 1,100 hours of service in the region since January 2014.

Want to join our legions of compassionate volunteers? Visit our volunteer page to learn more.

 

Sign up for our Oct. 30 Annual Meeting at the Global Center for Health Innovation in Cleveland. Free and open to the public.  

 

When Illness Prevails, Time Can Be a Gift

October 13, 2014

All of us will experience the death of a loved one at some point in our lives. Perhaps it will be the expected death of an elderly, ailing relative or maybe it will be the sudden and unexpected demise of a young motorcyclist.  Another more common scenario is that the one you love becomes seriously ill and although you know he or she is dying, when it happens it comes as a great shock.  You are overwhelmed by powerful emotions and it feels like a sudden death.

In sudden or traumatic death, the event is unexpected and abrupt. Life is turned upside down.  The person you loved was taken away without any warning.  Nothing makes sense.  And, there was no time to do any of the end-of-life “things” that one can address when the death can be anticipated.  There was no time for reconciliation, for finishing unfinished business, for saying “I love you” or “Good-bye.”

But when your loved one is seriously ill and you know that the end of his or her life is near, you can use this luxury of time as an opportunity to be together – to share thoughts, feelings and memories. During this pre-death time, as the illness advances, wonderful things can happen and while it won’t take away the pain of grief post death, it may soften it.

Here are some considerations: Communication between individuals can be difficult even when things are good, but it’s so important to figure out how to communicate during this time without hurting feelings.  It is through communication that we can learn what is meaningful and important at this time.  It is through communication, that one can reconcile relationships and find closure.

This can be a time to reflect on the past.  Remembering and telling stories, looking at pictures and listening to familiar music can be helpful.  Good memories can be fuel for conversation and the stories produced can be passed on from generation to generation, keeping the spirit of the person alive.  Reminiscences often kindle the feelings of meaning and purpose.

There is no right or wrong way to grieve and no one can be truly prepared when death happens. Whether death is sudden or expected, grief hurts. If you are able to share time together as an illness progresses, it will be a gift you always cherish.  Remember, you do not have to grieve alone.

 

Please visit our on-line grief discussions groups at http://www.hospicewr.org/discussions/grief/.

Please like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ESPBCenter.

This article can also be seen on ShareWIK.

President Obama Signs IMPACT Act for Hospice Oversight

October 9, 2014

President Obama signed the “Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014” (IMPACT Act) into law on Sept. 7.  The act includes provisions that create greater oversight and increased transparency of end-of-life care providers.

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), provisions that affect hospice providers are:

  1. Mandated surveys of Medicare-certified hospice providers at least every three years, for the next 10 years at the minimum.
  2. Medical reviews for hospice programs with a soon-to-be determined percentage/number of patients receiving care for more than 180 days. The specific patient load that would trigger this medical review will be set by CMS.
  3. Hospice reimbursement and the hospice aggregate financial cap to be aligned using a common inflationary index.

NHPCO President and CEO, J. Donald Schumacher, said the act will reassure Americans that hospice organizations are being held to a high standard.

“As hospice and palliative care providers, we care for patients and families at one of life’s most vulnerable times,” Schumacher said. “Americans need to know that all Medicare-certified providers are committed to the highest standards of quality and compliance.”

“This new law strengthens oversight and transparency throughout the entire hospice community. The new provisions are critica.”

NHPCO reports that more than 1.5 million dying Americans receive care for the nation’s hospice providers every year.

Job Opening: Technical Support Specialist

October 9, 2014

 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST
Location: Cleveland, OH

Provide support to end users on issues related to performance, maintenance and use of the agency’s personal computers, networks and applications. Research, analyze and resolve assigned problems and escalate to appropriate areas when needed.

Requirements:

Two years post high school education and two years’ work experience in help desk, database support and data conversion or related work. Additional work experience may be substituted for education

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Job Opening: Dietary Server

October 9, 2014

 

DIETARY SERVER
Location: Cleveland, OH

Prepare and serve meals. Wash dishes and clean kitchen.

Requirements:

Must be able to read, write and carry out instructions

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Job Opening: Triage Nurse

October 9, 2014

 

TRIAGE NURSE
Location: Cleveland, OH

Respond to the needs of patients and/or caregivers during the hours when primary team members are unavailable. This may be done via telephone communication and/or a home visit.

Requirements:

Licensed RN in state of Ohio; Experience preferred in pain and symptom management, oncology, or mental health.

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Job Opening: On Call Home Visit Nurse

October 9, 2014

 

ON CALL HOME VISIT NURSE
Location: Cleveland, OH

Provide palliative nursing care and support to patient and family, dispatched from home as needed. Assess physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs of the patient and family. Provide intermittent skilled nursing services to the patient under the patient’s physician’s direction.

Requirements:

Licensed RN in state of Ohio; Experience preferred in pain and symptom management, oncology, or mental health.

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Job Opening: Utility/Security/Maintenance

October 9, 2014

 

UTILITY/SECURITY/MAINTENANCE
Location: Cleveland, OH

Provide building operations, security and maintenance services. Perform building and grounds security checks. Respond to maintenance and repair requests.

Requirements:

Must be able to read, write and carry out instructions.

Email resume and/or application to recruitment@hospicewr.org or fax to 216.298.0388.

Volunteer Opportunities

Back to job listings

 

About Hospice of the Western Reserve

Hospice of the Western Reserve provides palliative end-of-life care, caregiver support, and bereavement services throughout Northern Ohio.  In celebration of the individual worth of each life, we strive to relieve suffering, enhance comfort, promote quality of life, foster choice in end-of-life care and support effective grieving.

Pediatric Palliative Care Important Care Component for Seriously Ill Children

October 7, 2014

Dr. Sarah Friebert_portraitBy Sarah Friebert, M.D.

Sarah Friebert, MD, FAAP, FAAPHM, founder and medical director of Akron Children’s Hospital’s Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Center, is board certified in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Hospice and Palliative Medicine. She is Professor of Pediatrics at Northeast Ohio Medical University, a past recipient of the Miracle Maker Award from the Children’s Miracle Network, and the inaugural holder of an endowed chair created in her name. Dr. Friebert also serves under contract as Hospice of the Western Reserve’s Pediatric Medical Director.

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In a perfect world, no parent would have to experience the serious illness or death of a child. But it is not a perfect world and 53,000 children die in the United States each year. For these families, as well as the families of the more than 500,000 children suffering from life-threatening conditions, a pediatric palliative care (PPC) team can help enhance the child’s quality of life, help parents make informed decisions about treatment options and help address the family’s psychological, spiritual, emotional and practical needs. Working in concert with other involved providers, a PPC team offers comprehensive, interdisciplinary, family-centered, team-based care for patients of all ages, from prenatal to young adult.

Palliative care is a growing subspecialty in pediatric medicine. The first hospital-based PPC began about 15 years ago, and can now be found in a majority of children’s hospitals. Most children referred to palliative care programs have life-threatening neurological or neurodegenerative conditions, trauma, complications of prematurity, chromosomal/genetic abnormalities, complex congenital heart disease, cancer, or metabolic diseases.

A common misconception is that there is no place for palliative care until all curative, life-prolonging options have been exhausted. In fact, rigid distinctions between curative and palliative interventions may hinder appropriate provision of palliative care, and many treatment options fall into both categories.

At or shortly after diagnosis, palliative care physicians and team members meet with the child and family to identify their goals and develop an individualized plan of care. In addition to management of pain and other distressing symptoms, the PPC team assists the family in goal-directed decision making, care coordination, management of transitions, anticipatory grief/bereavement, family coping and resiliency, and many other aspects of being or caring for a child with a life-threatening condition.

The relationship between the PPC team and the family can extend for months, years, or even decades. Sometimes children even graduate from PPC. When children do die, the palliative care team follows up with families at regular intervals through mailings, individual phone and in-person counseling, group support, remembrance services, and anniversary/birthday cards.

In short, PPC is not just about death and dying. The American Academy of Pediatrics has stated that when a child is facing a serious illness, the goal should be to add life to the child’s years, not simply years to the child’s life. As the mother of one of my patients put it, “When we first heard about PPC, we thought it meant that everyone had given up on my son. We soon learned otherwise, and now we don’t know what we did before you came into our lives. Who wouldn’t want this kind of care?”